Why Banning Russians from Schengen Is Unlawful (2023)

On Monday, Volodymyr Zelensky, Ukraine’s president, called on Western countries to ban all Russian travelers. On the same day, the Prime Minister of Finland, Sanna Marin, asked for an EU-wide ban for Russian citizens from Schengen, targeting tourists with Russian passports more specifically. “It’s not right that at the same time as Russia is waging an aggressive, brutal war of aggression in Europe, Russians can live a normal life, travel in Europe, be tourists. It’s not right,” Marin told Yle. In the meantime, Estonia decided to refuse issuing visas or residence permits to Russian students, limiting them to Russian workers and the Latvian embassy in Russia has simply stopped issuing visas to Russian citizens for an indefinite period of time.

The aggression against Ukraine is ongoing. Unquestionably, the horrible crimes perpetrated by the Russian state should be punished. Does citizenship equate to the state, however? And should all Russian citizens be put in the same basket, the mere possession of a particular citizenship emerging as the trigger of responsibility? Certainly not. Russians are citizens of a totalitarian state, they are not Putin. Many of them are strongly against the Putin regime and are as powerless and outraged by the war as Minister Marin. It is not only ethically wrong to punish a heterogeneous group of more than a hundred million on the basis of citizenship – a lottery ticket which they have not chosen.

Citizenship-based punishment is also unlawful. President Zelensky need not be guided by EU law: his task is to win the war and to save his country, but Ms. Marin is obliged to consider the key principles and laws binding Finland. Whether she likes it or not, there is no legal way under current EU law to adopt a blanket citizenship-based ban against Russians acquiring Schengen visas. In short, the WWI ‘enemy aliens’ approach, which predates the advent of human rights, has no place in the 21st century. It is outdated, illegal and should be dropped. Even more: political attention paid to it by persons in leadership positions is deeply surprising, if not irresponsible.

(Video) Russian visa ban a matter of national security and EU credibility

The Schengen visa system: a foreign policy tool, with strict legal framing

Some EU actions related to the war in Ukraine were praised – and rightly so. One of the most important breakthroughs is the record-time activation of the temporary protection directive to help Ukrainian refugees. Sanctions against the Russian regime and its puppets were equally applauded. However, the approach of sanctioning, among those close to Putin, only Russian citizens and leaving the Schröders out has been criticized, just like the focus on the oligarchs, who are as powerless, it appears, as their poorer brethren.

Adopting sanctions exclusively based on citizenship is far from proper in the world cherishing human rights, where citizenship itself, constitutes the main factor of inequalities around the globe. Citizenship-based exclusions from Schengen also raise issues of lawfulness and legality. Pressured by several Member States, the EU Commission has rightly declared that it cannot decide to limit the issuance of Schengen visas to Russian citizens. Indeed, current EU law does not provide for such a ban.

The so-called Schengen visa is one visa among many others that EU Member States can grant and cannot exceed 90 days in any 180-day period. The Schengen visa is peculiar in that it is valid for the whole Schengen area, comprising all the EU Members, except Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Ireland and Cyprus. It includes several third countries (Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Lichtenstein), as opposed to other visas delivered by Member States under national and EU law, such as long-stay visas for students. Until 2021, Russian citizens constituted the main group benefiting from Schengen visas: 536 241 in 2021, the second group being Chinese citizens (27 458 in 2021).

Since the entry in force in June 2007 of the Agreement between the European Community and the Russian Federation on the facilitation of the issuance of visas to the citizens of the European Union and the Russian Federation and until recently, some groups of Russians citizens (journalists, diplomats, official delegations, business people, students, close relatives, etc.) benefited from some facilitation measures for the issuances of Schengen visas (documentary evidence, length of the procedure and visa fees). Some ‘super-privileged’ groups – diplomats – benefited from even more privileges (e.g. multiple-entry visas with the term of validity of up to five years). This agreement is part of a broad network of instruments used as bargaining tools with third countries. In the Russian case, it was directly tied to a readmission agreement concluded in parallel, which entered into force on the same day, allowing the EU to send more people to Putin’s Russia.

(Video) Entry to the EU is denied for Russians: Baltic states introduced strict visa restriction

Third-country nationals who receive a Schengen visa can enter from any border crossing point in the Schengen area. This is precisely what the prime minister of Finland was complaining about: since the opening of the Imatra border crossing point between Finland and Russia in early July (both Finland and Russia have lifted the COVID restrictions at the border), Russians in possession of a Schengen visa tend to cross via this specific point. Unsurprisingly so, given the EU’s closure of the airspace with Russia in February: flying via Armenia, Serbia, Turkey or the UAE is quite expensive. Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (leaving the northern crossing with Norway out) are thus for many the easiest crossing point to reach other destinations in the EU.

Kaja Kallas, Estonia’s Prime Minister, sees it as a problem: “while Schengen countries issue visas, neighbours to Russia carry the burden”, she wrote on Twitter. Does this justify the adoption of an automatic ban championed by Latvia and Estonia? Absolutely not, as there is no provision in the current Schengen acquis which would allow for the adoption of a blanket ban on visas for the citizens of one country in particular. Exceptions to the Schengen visa rules regarding restrictions and bans are exhaustively set out in the legal texts:

  1. They can relate to the suspension of the Facilitation Agreement (and not the Schengen visa issuance itself), resulting in the suspension of (part of) the facilitations conditions. Two ways to suspend agreement privileges are available. Firstly, Article 15(6) of the Facilitation Agreement EU-Russia stipulates that each Party may suspend the Agreement in whole or in part for reasons of public order, protection of national security or protection of public health. This clause was activated by the Council just after the break-out of the war on February 25 and suspended the privileges enjoyed by diplomats, related groups and business people. As a result, all these categories are now under the non-privileged rules of the Schengen Visa Code. One wonders why the EU hadn’t already suspended these privileges in reaction to the annexation of Crimea. Secondly, Article 25a of the Visa Code empowers the Council to suspend (part of) these privileges or impose higher visa fees when the country is not cooperating sufficiently in the field of readmission, exacerbating potential “selectivity effects of the visa policy by discriminating between individual cases owing to the political performance of the country of nationality”. In any case, these mechanisms do not foresee bans solely based on nationality.
  2. The second option concerns individual travel bans, in particular via common foreign and security policy This mechanism has been used by the Council toward several people close to Putin. Annulment requests are currently pending before the General Court.

No blanket ban possible under the current Schengen Acquis

It is beyond any doubt that any blanket ban which implies an automatic refusal of a Schengen visa to any Russian citizen is unlawful. Not only is it in violation of the 2007 Facilitation Agreement, which has been only partly suspended by the Council (Russian journalists, students and some other categories still benefit from it), but more fundamentally it is in breach of the foundational principles of the entire Schengen visa regime. As opposed to Schengen borders which can be easily closed under some exceptional circumstances – exceptions which have been largely used (and abused according to the ECJ) by the Member States since 2015 – there is no possibility in the Schengen acquis to introduce a blanket ban towards the nationals of one country, however exceptional the circumstances.

The Visa Code is crystal clear: Member States should examine each application for a Schengen visa individually and, in case of refusal, the reasons – which are exhaustively listed in Article 32(1) of the Visa Code – should be clearly stated. In response, applicants have a right to appeal (Article 32(3)). As a consequence, it is prohibited to adopt a blanket ban, or automatically refuse any citizen of any country. The same rules apply for long-stay visas which fall under EU immigration law Directives. The ECJ has been abundantly clear that visa decisions should be individual, i.e. they should take into account the personal circumstances of the applicant. Moreover, Member States are under an unconditional obligation to provide for a meaningful appeal procedure against decisions refusing a visa. Even when a Member State wants to refuse a Schengen or a long-stay visa under an EU immigration Directive for reasons linked to a threat to public policy, internal security or public health, they should do so on an individual basis. While this could be a ground to refuse Schengen visas to Putin’s officials, to announce ‘we do not issue visas to Russians’ is a violation of EU law.

(Video) EU asylum in doubt for Russians fleeing army draft

There is obviously a risk that instead of a blanket ban, some Member States could abuse their margin of appreciation and systematically refuse Schengen visas for Russian citizens on phony public policy or internal security grounds, as a way of irrational collective retribution, unknown to EU law. Although harmful and illegal, such systematic practice would be much more difficult to challenge in practice. Any state that does not even pretend to act on the individual basis, like Estonia unlawfully discriminating against Russian students, is committing a violation of EU law, which is possible to capture and challenge due to its blunt nature.

The EU cannot overlook fundamental principles and rights

The question that follows is whether it would be possible to amend the Schengen acquis to provide for blanket citizenship-based exclusions. The answer is less straightforward. The EU is competent to adopt measures concerning the common policy on visas and short-stay residence permits, in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure (Article 77(2)(a) TFEU). The Schengen acquis is fully part of EU law and can be modified on that basis. In fact, the Convention implementing the Schengen Agreement has been modified several times already and additional regulations developing the Schengen acquis have been adopted and regularly amended, among them the Visa Code.

Automaticity is the anti-thesis of the whole Schengen visa system. Political will and the possibility to amend aside, the adoption of a blanket citizenship-based ban would contradict the very ratio legis of the Schengen visa system: the individualisation of the treatment of a visa applications. It would imply a complete change of the rationale underpinning the issuance of Schengen visas, which is based on individual assessment of whether the applicants fulfil the conditions and constitute a risk of illegal immigration or a risk to the security of the Member States (Article 21(1) of the Visa Code). The Schengen Convention, the Common Visa Code, the Handbook for the processing of visa applications and the modification of issued visas, as well astheHandbook for the administrative management of visa processing provide for a strictly individual basis of assessment. Even a previous visa refusal cannot lead to an automatic refusal of a new application (Article 21(9) Visa Code). It also transpires from a settled case-law of the ECJ that the decision should be individual and that an effective remedy should be provided to the applicant (ECJ, R.N.N.S. and K.A., C-225/19 and C-226/19, para. 43 and the case-law cited). Although the principle of good administration (Article 41 of the EU Charter of fundamental rights, CFR ) applies only to EU institutions and bodies, it also sets the tone as to the importance of having someone’s case handled individually.

The organization of the Schengen system aside, the question of respect of fundamental rights is crucial in this case. In her tweet, Kaja Kallas wrote “Stop issuing tourist visas to Russians,” “Visiting Europe is a privilege, not a human right”. If she is right that there is no fundamental right to receive a Schengen visa, it does not mean that fundamental rights do not apply to more than a hundred million people she happens to be tweeting against, when examining and assessing a visa application. An automatic refusal toward any Russian citizens would obviously be in contradiction with the fundamental principle of equality before the law (Article 20 CFR). It would also raise important questions of discrimination. Although EU law does not protect third country nationals against discrimination on grounds of nationality, even under the Charter (e.g. see ECJ, C‑22/08 and C‑23/08, Vatsourasand Koupatantze and ECJ, X. v. Belgian State, C-930/19), the European Court on Human Rights, on the contrary, considers that a difference of treatment on grounds of nationality only constitutes a suspect criterion which calls for stricter scrutiny based on very weighty reasons.

(Video) Finland began punishing Russia: No visa

What’s more, Article 21(1) CFR prohibits discrimination on the ground of ethnic origin. Although the Court adopts a restrictive understanding of discrimination on grounds of ethnicity, it is not difficult to identify persons of a given ethnic origin who are at a disadvantage: Russian citizens are mainly ethnic Russians.

More fundamentally, among Russian citizens who ask for a Schengen visa, there are not only tourists who were vehemently criticized by the Finnish and Estonian Prime Ministers, but also people who leave Russia for other reasons: humanitarian grounds, family, work, medical appointments, studies, and so on. Not examining these applications on an individual basis would be an attack on an array of fundamental rights, including the right to private and family life and the prohibition of torture and inhuman treatment. It would also sideline Russian citizens who live in a third country and apply for Schengen visas (between 150.000 and 300.000 have left Russia since the start of the war and millions more did so earlier).

In any case, the reason for applying for a visa and the place where Russian citizens live notwithstanding, the war between Russian and Ukraine is not a compelling justification to treat Russian citizens as pariahs unworthy of human rights for no rational reason, given that Russia, like the majority of countries in the world, is not a democracy and that citizenship cannot be chosen or easily renounced. Vile retributive logic is an unsuitable ground for a complete overhaul of the Schengen visa regime, established to diminish, rather than to boost violations of fundamental rights.

Many thanks to Chloé Brière and Dimitry Kochenov for their insightful comments on a previous version of the text. The usual disclaimers apply.

(Video) RUSSIANS GO TO EUROPE: crossing the border. Listen to slow Russian, learn VERBS OF MOTION in context

FAQs

Can Russians get Schengen visas? ›

The consulted Member State can object to a Schengen visa being issued to a Russian national, on an individual basis. If issued, the visa would then be limited to the territory of the issuing Member State, and not grant access to the entire Schengen area.

Can Russians travel to the EU? ›

The EU will remain open to certain categories of Russian visa applicants travelling for essential purposes, including notably family members of EU citizens, journalists, dissidents and civil society representatives.

Can Russians go to the Netherlands? ›

Yes, this is possible. Passengers can fly to the Netherlands from Russia via certain other countries, including the United Arab Emirates.

Can Russians get visas? ›

Russian citizens who wish to travel to the US for business or tourism purposes must apply for a US B1/B2 Visa. While the application process cannot be 100% online, iVisa can help you obtain the confirmation page you are required to have for your interview at the embassy, and they can do that offline or online.

Can Russian citizens travel freely abroad? ›

The Russian passport is considered the 48th in the ranking in terms of travel freedom according to the Henley Passport Index, as Russian citizens have visa-free or visa on arrival access to over 120 countries and territories.

Can Russian travel to Spain? ›

Spain is open for travel. Most visitors from Russia can travel to Spain without restrictions. No quarantine is required. Find travel restrictions, quarantine and entry requirements to travel Spain.

Where can Russian people travel to? ›

Countries Where Russian Citizens Need eVisas
CountryAllowed stay
Rwanda30 days
Saudi Arabia90 days
Singapore30 days
South Sudan3 months up to 6 months
24 more rows

How long does it take to get visa to Russia? ›

Submit the invitation, the form, your passport, a passport photograph, and the processing fee (money order or cashier's check only) to the Russian Embassy. Applications are accepted anywhere from 30 to 60 days before departure (figure on two to four weeks for processing from the time your application is received).

Can Indian go to Russia without a visa? ›

Tourist Visa is required in case you enter Russian Federation for tourism purposes. Tourist visa can be valid for up to 30 days and can be issued for single or double entry. Dates of validity of the visa will correspond with the dates mentioned on your tourist confirmation.

Can Russian citizens travel to Germany? ›

Germany schengen visa is required for Russian citizens. The stay is usually short with a period of 90 days and visa expires in 90 days. Applicant is required to be present when applying for Germany schengen visa. A total of 12 documents are required for applying Germany schengen visa.

Can Russian citizens travel to Cyprus? ›

Cyprus tourist visa conditions for Russian citizens

Cyprus is a member of EU but not yet part of Schengen Area. Cyprus also accept Schengen visas along with visas issues by Bulgaria, Croatia and Romania for stays of up to 90 days in a 180-day period.

Is Russian passport powerful? ›

As of 19 July 2022, Russian citizens had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 119 countries and territories, ranking the Russian passport 50th in terms of travel freedom according to the Henley Passport Index.

Can Russian citizens travel to Italy now? ›

Open. Italy is open for travel. Most visitors from Russia can travel to Italy without restrictions. No quarantine is required.

Which countries can enter Russia without visa? ›

Group 1. Countries: Azerbaijan, Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Ukraine. Citizens of the countries of the CIS (the Commonwealth of Independent States) are permitted to stay in the Russian Federation for up to 90 days without a visa.

How much money can you leave Russia with? ›

During the calendar year, individuals may transfer no more than 10,000 US dollars or an equivalent amount in another currency from their accounts with Russian banks to their foreign accounts or to another individual abroad.

How many Russians are leaving Russia? ›

Following the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, more than 300,000 Russian citizens and residents are estimated to have left Russia by mid-March 2022 as political refugees and economic migrants, and due to a desire to evade criminal prosecution for opposing the invasion.

Does Russia allow dual citizenship? ›

Russian dual citizenship is allowed only if Russia has reached an agreement with that country, and only two countries, namely Turkmenistan and Tajikistan, are involved. Otherwise, citizens who want to obtain citizenship in Russia are forced to renounce the original citizenship.

Can Russians visit Tenerife? ›

Likewise, Tenerife receives most Russian visitors, mainly due to its good connectivity with direct flights between the island and Moscow.

How many Russian tourists visit Spain? ›

The numbers began to bounce back in 2016 and were well on their way to recovery in 2019 when 1.8 million Russians spent their holidays in Spain, a 7 per cent rise over 2018.

Do Russians go to Majorca? ›

Mallorca Island has become an increasingly popular destination in the country in eastern Europe and the influx of visitors grows each year. A decade ago, only 8,000 Russians visited the island.

Can British go to Russia? ›

From 1 September 2021, British nationals, who have Russian nationals as their immediate family members, can apply for multi-entry private visas to Russia for up to one year. The visa holders can remain in Russia without restriction for the entire visa validity period.

Can a Russian citizen live in the UK? ›

Russian citizens need to apply for a visa if they intend to visit, work, study, or settle in the UK. However, the UK visa requirements for Russian Citizens depends on the type of application.

How strong is the US passport? ›

According to rankings from Henley & Partners, a citizenship advisory firm, the U.S. passport ranks seventh in the world when it comes to access. Americans can get into 186 international destinations without applying for additional visas in advance.

Which country is most difficult to get visa? ›

What are the Hardest Countries to Get a Visa To?
  • Russia.
  • Cuba.
  • Iran.
  • Turkmenistan.
  • Chad.
  • Bhutan.
  • Saudi Arabia.
  • Afghanistan.

How long can I stay in Russia without a visa? ›

Applicants planning to stay for more than 90 days in any 180-day period require a visa if they are going to Russia to conduct commercial or work-related activities. Diplomatic or Official passport holders require a visa for the whole period of their stay.

How can I live in Russia permanently? ›

A Russian permanent residence permit may be obtained after holding a temporary residence visa for two years. The Russian permanent residence permit has a five-year validity period and can be extended without any limitation. However, just like the temporary residence visa, it must be authenticated on an annual basis.

What percentage of Russia is in Europe? ›

Russia spans the northern part of the Eurasian continent; 77% of Russia's area is in Asia, the western 23% of the country is located in Europe.

Which country is not in Europe? ›

AustriaItaly
BulgariaLithuania
CroatiaLuxembourg
CyprusMalta
CzechiaThe Netherlands
9 more rows
15 Oct 2020

Which country fall entirely in Europe? ›

The largest country located entirely within Europe is c) Ukraine. This huge European country encompasses over 223,000 square miles.

How many Indians live in Moscow? ›

The size of the Indian Community in the Russian Federation is estimated at 14,000. In addition, there are about 1,500 Afghan nationals of Indian origin in Russia. 2. There are about 500 Indian businessmen residing in Russia of whom over 200 work in Moscow.

Can you drive from India to Russia? ›

Can we go to Russia by road from India? Yes, you can drive from India to Russia, provided you have acquired the travel documents and permits required to enter all the countries you'll be entering enroute, including China, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and of course, Russia.

Can Indians get Russian citizenship? ›

Applicants must have lived in Russia for at least five years. They must hold a permanent residence card. Having proficiency in speaking and understanding the Russian language is a must. They must have renounced previous citizenships.

Can Russians get German visa? ›

The Germany (Schengen) Visa as a Citizen of Russia

Russian residents will need a visa to go to Germany (Schengen) area of Europe. You can now fill out the visa application online from your phone or PC. That way, you only have to go to the visa center for the interview process.

What is 3G rule in Germany? ›

According to the Ordinance on Coronavirus Entry Regulations, the 3G rules apply when crossing the border to Germany. This means anyone aged 12 or over should present a negative test result or proof of vaccination or recovery when entering the country.

Can Americans travel to Germany? ›

Yes. As of June 11, travelers from all countries except China can enter Germany for all purposes, including tourism.

Do Russians need visa for Greece? ›

Greece schengen visa is required for Russian citizens. The stay is usually short with a period of 90 days and visa expires in 90 days. Applicant is required to be present when applying for Greece schengen visa. A total of 12 documents are required for applying Greece schengen visa.

Can Russians travel to Cyprus without visa? ›

Do I need a visa to enter Cyprus? Russian citizens require a visa. A list of countries whose passport holders require a visa to enter the Republic of Cyprus is available here. 2.

How much does it cost to get a visa to Russia? ›

$160 / $160

What is the strongest visa in the world? ›

The world's most powerful passports

Japanese citizens now hold the most passport power, as they are able to enter 193 nations visa free, or with visa-on-arrival. South Korea and Singapore hold joint second place, with both countries' passports enabling their citizens to access 192 nations without restrictions.

Which is number one passport in the world? ›

Japan has the world's most powerful passport - providing hassle-free entry to 193 countries. Just one country short, Singapore and South Korea are tied in second place, according to the latest Henley Passport Index from Henley & Partners, an immigration consultancy.

Which citizenship is best? ›

French nationality remained the best in the world according to the 2018 edition of the Quality of Nationality Index, earning a score of 83.5% out of a possible 100%, fractionally ahead of Germany and the Netherlands.

Do Russians need a visa for France? ›

France schengen visa is required for Russian citizens. The stay is usually short with a period of 90 days and visa expires in 90 days. Applicant is required to be present when applying for France schengen visa. A total of 12 documents are required for applying France schengen visa.

How do Russian citizens apply for a Schengen visa? ›

In order to successfully apply for a Schengen visa as a Russian passport holder or citizen, you need to source for, prepare, arrange and submit the required documents. These documents must be personally lodged with the competent embassy or consulate, or the official external visa processing party.

Can Russians travel to Sardinia? ›

Yes, entry into Italy is currently allowed from Russia. What are the travel restrictions in Sardinia? What is the national COVID-19 helpline number in Sardinia? The national COVID-19 helpline number in Sardinia is 1500.

Is crime high in Russia? ›

Russia crime rate & statistics for 2018 was 8.21, a 10.12% decline from 2017.
...
Russia Crime Rate & Statistics 1990-2022.
Russia Crime Rate & Statistics - Historical Data
YearPer 100K PopulationAnnual % Change
20197.68-6.46%
20188.21-10.12%
20179.13-16.35%
28 more rows

Do UK citizens need visa for Russia? ›

Do UK Nationals Need a Visa for Russia? Yes, UK passport holders need a visa to travel to Russia. Every British national will be asked to present a visa at the Russian port of entry. A visa is required even for transiting.

Does Israeli need visa to Russia? ›

Russia tourist visa is not required for citizens of Israel for a stay up to 30 days. Good news if tourist visa is the correct choice for the purpose of your trip to Russia.

Which countries have stopped issuing visas to Russians? ›

The Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Belgium have also stopped issuing visas to citizens of Russians. Czechia was one of the first countries to do so.

Do Russians need visa for Europe? ›

Visa application process

Russian citizens need to be in possession of a valid visa to enter the Schengen Area. N.B: The possession of a Schengen visa does not guarantee the right to enter the Schengen area as the fulfilment of entry conditions and purpose of stay is checked during border control.

How much is a Schengen visa for Russians? ›

The Schengen Visa fee for nationals from Russia stands at €40.
...
What is the price of a Schengen visa?
Visa cost USDVisa cost €
Adult$88€80
Children 6-12$45€40
Children <6freefree

Do Russians need visa to Italy? ›

Italy schengen visa is required for Russian citizens. The stay is usually short with a period of 90 days and visa expires in 90 days. Applicant is required to be present when applying for Italy schengen visa. A total of 12 documents are required for applying Italy schengen visa.

Can Russian citizens travel to Germany? ›

Germany schengen visa is required for Russian citizens. The stay is usually short with a period of 90 days and visa expires in 90 days. Applicant is required to be present when applying for Germany schengen visa. A total of 12 documents are required for applying Germany schengen visa.

Can a Russian get a UK visa? ›

UK Visa Requirements and Fees for Russian Citizens. Russian citizens need to apply for a visa if they intend to visit, work, study, or settle in the UK. However, the UK visa requirements for Russian Citizens depends on the type of application. Moreover, the UK visa fee in Russia depends on the type of application.

Do Russian citizens need visa to Poland? ›

What are the requirements for Russian nationals to enter Poland? Russian nationals traveling to Poland for an immigrant visa appointment at U.S. Embassy Warsaw will need a Schengen visa. The Government of Poland makes determinations regarding the entry of foreign nationals into that country.

How powerful is the Russian passport? ›

Visa-free travel

As of 11 January 2022, Russian citizens had visa-free or visa on arrival access to 119 countries and territories, ranking the Russian passport 46th in terms of travel freedom (tied with Palau Islands) according to the Henley visa restrictions index.

Can Indian go to Russia without a visa? ›

Tourist Visa is required in case you enter Russian Federation for tourism purposes. Tourist visa can be valid for up to 30 days and can be issued for single or double entry. Dates of validity of the visa will correspond with the dates mentioned on your tourist confirmation.

Is Russia part of Schengen? ›

The European countries that are not part of the Schengen zone are Albania, Andora, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, Georgia, Ireland, Kosovo, North Macedonia, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Turkey, Ukraine, The United Kingdom and Vatican City.

Can you get a 5 year Schengen visa? ›

The basic version allows you to spend 90 days at a time within the area over a period of 180 days, up to as many trips in and out as you require. Multiple-entry Schengen Visas are also available lasting one, three, and five years - covering you for any trips within that period.

Do Russians need visa to enter Germany? ›

Russian residents will need a visa to go to Germany (Schengen) area of Europe. You can now fill out the visa application online from your phone or PC. That way, you only have to go to the visa center for the interview process. Enjoy the best sights and sounds that Germany has to offer!

Which countries can travel to EU without visa? ›

To travel to Europe without a visa, you need a passport with a minimum validity of at least 3 months beyond the period of your expected stay in the region.
...
The European countries that are not part of the Schengen zone are:
  • Albania.
  • Armenia.
  • Azerbaijan.
  • Belarus.
  • Bosnia & Herzegovina.
  • Bulgaria.
  • Croatia.
  • Cyprus.

Do Russians need visa to Dubai? ›

Step 1 : Russian citizens can arrive at UAE without a visa. Step 2 : After arriving, Russian citizens can go to UAE immigration counter. Step 3 : Show travel document like Original Passport or Travel document of Russia. Step 4 : Once you get entry stamp, you can enter UAE and stay for the duration on your stamping.

Do Russians need visa for Turkey? ›

Nationals of the Russian Federation can enter Turkey visa-free as well, and stay here for up to 90 days within half a year, without exceeding the maximum of 60 days per visit.

How many countries can Russian passport enter without visa? ›

Russian passport is the 51st in the Henley Report, which means you have visa-free access to 82 countries*. In addition to this, you can get an eVisa to 29 countries and a visa on arrival to 34.

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